China suspends US talks over Taiwan arms deal – Shanghai Daily

U.S. Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner and President Hu Jintao in June 2009

U.S. Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner and President Hu Jintao in June 2009

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China announced yesterday it will postpone bilateral military programs and security talks and impose sanctions against companies in response to the US government’s planned US$6.4 billion arms deal with Taiwan.

A Foreign Ministry announcement said China had decided to partially halt exchange programs between the two countries’ military forces, as well as vice-ministerial talks on strategic security, arms control and anti-proliferation, scheduled to be held soon.

China will also impose sanctions on US companies involved in the arms deal to Taiwan, the press statement said.

The Obama administration advised US Congress on Friday of the proposed sale to Taiwan, a potential US$6.4 billion package including Black Hawk helicopters, Patriot “Advanced Capability-3” anti-missile missiles, and two refurbished Osprey-class mine-hunting ships.

The Chinese Defence Ministry also lodged a stern protest yesterday afternoon.

Qian Lihua, the Defence Ministry’s Foreign Affairs Office director, summoned the defence attache of the US Embassy in Beijing to lodge the protest, according to a press statement.

In a similar warning lodged with the US ambassador to China, Jon Huntsman, Chinese Vice Foreign Minister, He Yafei, said the country was “strongly indignant” about the proposed sale of weapons.

The US decision “constitutes a gross intervention into China’s internal affairs, seriously endangers China’s national security and harms China’s peaceful reunification efforts,” He was quoted saying in a Foreign Ministry statement.

“The US plan will definitely undermine China-US relations and bring about serious negative impact on exchanges and cooperation in major areas between the two countries, and lead to an aftermath both sides would not prefer,” He said.

He urged the US side to “fully recognize the gravity of the issue, revoke the erroneous decision on arms sales to Taiwan and stop selling weapons to Taiwan.”

The sale is viewed as a serious contravention of three joint communiques between China and the United States, especially the “August 17” communique agreed on in 1982.

The United States said in the 1982 agreement that “it does not seek to carry out a long-term policy of arms sales to Taiwan” and “intends to reduce gradually its sales of arms to Taiwan, leading over a period of time to a final resolution.”

In 2008, China curtailed military exchanges with the United States after the Bush administration approved a US$6.5 billion Taiwan arms deal, including 30 Apache attack helicopters and 330 Patriot missiles.

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FACTBOX-U.S. companies involved in Taiwan arms sales

Boeing China Airliner

Boeing China Airliner

Jan 30 (Reuters) – China said it would impose sanctions on companies involved in a planned $6.4 billon arms package for Taiwan that the Obama administration sent the U.S. Congress on Friday.

Here are the main arms included in the package, and the companies that make them. Other weapons systems are to be opened to bid.

* Sikorsky Aircraft Corp, a unit of United Technologies Corp (UTX.N), would supply 60 UH-60M Black Hawk utility helicopters. The estimated cost is $3.1 billion. United Technologies sells Otis elevators and Carrier brand heating and air-conditioning in China.

* Lockheed Martin Corp (LMT.N) would build 114 Patriot Advanced Capability-3 anti-missile missiles for Taiwan. Raytheon Co (RTN.N) would integrate the systems. The deal’s estimated value is $2.8 billion. Neither of these companies is believed to do major business with China.

* Boeing Co (BA.N)’s McDonnell Douglas unit builds Harpoon Block II Telemetry missiles. A proposed sale of 12 of them to Taiwan would be worth about $37 million. Boeing sells commercial aircraft to Chinese airlines. (Sources: Reuters, U.S. Defense Security Cooperation Agency) (For more on U.S.-China relations, click [ID:nCHINA]) (Reporting by Ralph Jennings and Jim Wolf, editing by Anthony Boadle)

State Council: U.S. planned arms sale to Taiwan runs counter to sound development of cross-Strait relations

English.news.cn

BEIJING, Jan. 30 (Xinhua) — The Taiwan Affairs Office of the State Council said Saturday that U.S. planned arms sale to Taiwan was in violation of its commitment to supporting the peaceful development of the cross-Strait relations.

The move ran counter both to the sound development of the cross-Strait relations and to the fundamental interests of the Taiwan people in the long run, said a spokesperson for the office.

The official said the fact that the U.S. side announced plans to sell advanced weapons to Taiwan in disregard of strong opposition from China would only instigate the pro-independence forces in the island and hamper the peaceful development of the cross-Strait relations.

The spokesperson also said the improved cross-Strait relations were in the common aspiration of the people on both sides of the Strait and had won support from the international community.

The current situation did not come easy, and therefore should be cherished, the spokesperson added.