2009: A Resurgence of Eugenics?

Old-Thinker News | Feb. 3, 2009

By Daniel Taylor

As the world moves further into economic chaos, eugenics, an old idea cloaked under modern terminology, is making a comeback. During these times it is easy to see how a resurgence and re-packaging of eugenics could come about. Do you have more than two children? Your carbon footprint has been deemed unacceptable. Your economic burden on society cannot be tolerated during unprecedented economic times. The growing population of elderly individuals will be an incredible burden on a faltering system, we are told. Some governmental think tanks see younger generations pursuing euthanasia policies as an option.

Eugenics “went underground” after WWII, but continued under the guise of population control and environmentalism, proceeding partly with the aid of Rockefeller family wealth. Rather than focus on “quality control” the emphasis was on “quantity control”. One of the first books to tie these ideas together post-WWII, titled Our Plundered Planet, was written by Fairfield Osborn, who in 1921 served as the President of the Second International Congress of Eugenics in New York.

Today, we see calls for one or two child policies to be implemented to fight global warming. The Times recently reported, “Couples who have more than two children are being “irresponsible” by creating an unbearable burden on the environment, the government’s green adviser has warned.” The Times article reports that Jonathon Porritt, who directs the United Kingdom’s Sustainable Development Commission, is calling for abortion and contraception to fight global warming.

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Jon Stewart exposes Apple stock manipulation

By Prince McLean

Published: 03:00 PM EST

Proving once again that the best way to reach Americans’ brain is through their funny bone, Jon Stewart of the Daily Show continued his warpath aimed at irresponsible financial reporting by CNBC, specifically calling Jim Cramer out for his comments on how easy it was to profit from misinformation aimed at Apple.

Calling it “disingenuous at best and criminal at worst,” Stewart grilled Cramer, the host of the frantic energetic “Mad Money” entertainment show, for his act of being “doe-eyed innocent” while celebrating the admittedly illegal shenanigans of hedge fund managers.

Stewart played clips of Cramer describing — shortly before the iPhone was first announced — how hedge fund managers could spread lies about the product through either gullible or willing media sources, creating either fear or excitement that would distort the company’s stock, allowing the fund manager to profit.

Fomenting the market

In the clip filmed for The Street, Cramer notes that this practice of “fomenting the market” is “actually blatantly illegal, but when you have six days and your company may be in doubt because you are down, I think it is really important to foment.” Cramer specifically cited the example of stirring up rumors that Apple’s iPhone would be rejected by both AT&T and Verizon Wireless, and that it wouldn’t be ready to demonstrate in time for Macworld in 2007.

Apple’s stock performance leading up to the 2007 unveiling of the iPhone made it a prime candidate for foment and manipulation, as media figures spewing misinformation could easily cause temporary, panic-induced drops that manipulators could then use to profit dramatically from. Other companies, including Microsoft, had seen so little change in their stock price since the 2000 bubble popped that they simply couldn’t be manipulated as easily.

Fomenting the market against Apple, however, “is very easy, because the people who write about Apple want that story. And you can claim that it is credible because you spoke to someone at Apple, because Apple isn’t in [a position to comment on unannounced products]. It is an ideal short.”
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Stewart to Cramer: ‘It’s not a f**king game’

JAKE COYLE
AP News
Mar 13, 2009 06:06 EST

Jon Stewart hammered Jim Cramer and his network, CNBC, in their anticipated face-off on “The Daily Show,” repeatedly chastising the “Mad Money” host for putting entertainment above journalism.

“I understand that you want to make finance entertaining, but it’s not a … game,” Stewart told Cramer, adding in an expletive during the show’s Thursday taping. The episode was scheduled to air at 11 p.m. EDT on Comedy Central.

It was perhaps the hardest lashing Stewart has given to a TV commentator since 2004 when he called Tucker Carlson and his then co-host Paul Begala “partisan hacks” on CNN’s “Crossfire,” the since canceled political commentary program.

The program opened in mock hype of the confrontation, which caught headlines through the week as each snipped at the other over the air. The show announced it as “the weeklong feud of the century.”

In his opening, Stewart announced that it was “go time.” He played a video clip of Cramer’s Thursday guest appearance on “The Martha Stewart Show” in which Cramer beat a mound of dough, pretending it was Stewart.

Said Stewart: “Mr. Cramer, don’t you destroy enough dough on your own show?”

Once Cramer came out for the interview, Stewart wondered: “How the hell did we get here?”

Cramer, his sleeves characteristically rolled up, said he was a “fan of the show.”

But the humorous tone — at least for Stewart — changed as the interview continued.

Stewart repeatedly said Cramer wasn’t his target, but aired clip after clip of the CNBC pundit.

“Roll 210!” announced Stewart, like a prosecutor. “Roll 212!”

Most were from a 2006 interview not meant for TV in which Cramer spoke openly about the duplicity of the market.

“I can’t reconcile the brilliance and knowledge that you have of the intricacies of the market with the crazy … I see you do every night,” said the comedian.

Stewart said he and Cramer are both snake-oil salesman, only “The Daily Show” is labeled as such. He claimed CNBC shirked its journalistic duty by believing corporate lies, rather than being an investigative “powerful tool of illumination.” And he alleged CNBC was ultimately in bed with the businesses it covered — that regular people’s stocks and 401Ks were “capitalizing your adventure.”

For his part, Cramer disagreed with Stewart on a few points, but mostly acknowledged that he could have done a better job foreseeing the economic collapse: “We all should have seen it more.”

Cramer said CNBC was “fair game” to the criticism and acknowledged the network was perhaps overeager to believe the information it was fed from corporations.

“I, too, like you, want to have a successful show,” said Cramer, defending his methods on “Mad Money.” He later added: “Should we have been constantly pointing out the mistakes that were made? Absolutely. I truly wish we had done more.”

Cramer insisted he was devoted to revealing corporate “shenanigans,” to which Stewart retorted: “It’s easy to get on this after the fact.”

At one point, Cramer sounded the reformed sinner, responding to Stewart’s plea for more levelheaded, honest commentary: “How about I try that?” said Cramer. “I’ll do that.”

By the end, the two-segment interview went far beyond its allotted time. Comedy Central said the on-air version would be cut by about eight minutes, though the entire interview would be available unedited on ComedyCentral.com on Friday.
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